ashleynaftule
Ashley Naftule
ashleynaftule
Mar 11
21

I have no idea what they’re talking about. There’s a running gag of a news anchor arguing with his field reporter over the characterization of Qanon followers that implies the anchor supports them. Otherwise, Qanon followers are unambiguously depicted as brainwashed and/or morons. There is no depiction or mention of Read more

Feb 21
3

I suspect that part of the problem is that both high- and low-culture are vanishing into the ever-expanding middle-brow center. Comics may have been lowbrow, at least when Jack Kirby was at his prime, but the MCU is not. The glossy production values and ready-made lessons of the Marvel movies have little to do with Read more

Feb 21
1

It’s this weird desire for other people to love and respect these movies. And I like a lot of superhero movies, and I even love a few. But it’s like completely dominating the film landscape somehow isn’t enough. Everyone must also admit that a dude running around in an American flag outfit socking people with purple Read more

Feb 21
4

Also, please stop insisting that if I just watch this one comic book movie (always a different one when I reply I’ve seen it and didn’t like it) that I’ll suddenly be converted. With rare exceptions, I simply don’t enjoy the genre, and I’ve given it more than an adequate sampling to make that judgement. The Read more

Feb 20
3

On the one hand, this is a complicated issue that this article brilliantly tackles. On the other hand, it probably shouldn’t be all that controversial a proposition that some art is more complicated and deeper than other forms of art. And I sometimes wonder why so many people are defensive about that seemingly obvious Read more

Feb 20
11

I can and will argue that! What are the genres these movies are flitting between?! Is the idea that Tom Holland’s Spider-Man movies are high school comedies, while Guardians of the Galaxy is space opera? Because tonally, they aren’t wildly different, and they trade on shockingly similar ground considering their Read more

Feb 20
13

Yeah, the problem isn’t that the super-hero genre is dominant, it’s that two monoliths (MCU and to a lesser extent DCU) crank out extremely homogenous content to fill out their specific universe. This isn’t dozens of directors playing with tropes and ideas with a wide range of aesthetics, budgets, politics, visions, Read more

Feb 20
7

What are the richly rewarding superhero movies that Scorsese has ignored by only watching a few Marvel movies, though? Honestly, I think the whole idea of “superhero movie” as genre has gotten pretty misleading. It’s more like a subgenre. Or, more accurately, a formula.

Like, “horror” is a genre. “Romantic comedy” is Read more

Feb 20
15

I love Pixar, but that you’d take 20 movies (most of which are good, some of which are great) “in a walk” over Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Dick Tracy, The Color of Money, Con Air, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Ed Wood, He Got Game, Rushmore, High Fidelity, O Brother Where Art Thou, 25th Hour, Unbreakable, The Royal Read more

Feb 20
17

It’s not so much “lacking historical knowledge” as “lacking a perspective of what might be blowing the mind of a child today and making them want to be a filmmaker.” Read more

Feb 20
4

Everyone posting defensive comments on behalf of Netflix on Disney, please stop for 2 seconds and think about what it means that you feel the need to defend mega-corporations from criticism. Read more

Feb 19
42

There is seldom an opportunity to speak about Jackson’s King Kong. I saw it in the theater with the mix of wow and yikes and a sense that the LOTR magic might have been lightning in a bottle. But I’d watched the original King Kong beforehand, which helped for appreciating things like the original natives recreated as

Feb 19
18

The prequels at least had some great designs in ships, costumes and settings like the city of Theed and the palace on Naboo, our first look at Coruscant, Mustafar, Utapau, etc. That universe actually felt lived in.
Read more

Feb 11
10

Yeah one of the things I liked about the book is that Randall Flagg is awakened by the plague. He’s a roaming evil who has chosen this time to make his move. Having him be tied to the initial release of Captain Trips gets rid of that.

Jan 27
11

Came here for this, not disappointed. That episode has always been in my Top 10. I get why Groenig feels the way he does about it, but it’s a shame, because it’s one of the episodes that hits the gas pedal and just doesn’t let up. Every throwaway gag is just as funny as the stuff in the main story. Read more

Jan 27
25

The sad thing is, this Simpson’s episode was all James L. Brook’s baby. He was the EP on The Critic, and Groening felt that this was just a shameless attempt to push The Critic on audiences. Even to the point that he had his name removed from the credits and publicly criticized Brooks . And the reality is that it was Read more

Dec 17
18

Well, this clip from how the plague started shows that the reason Campion’s door didn’t close was because Randall Flagg’s foot was blocking it.

Dec 16
1

100% agree. I don’t think the book captured the highs of the first section afterward, and one sequence in particular had me scratching my head, as it read a bit silly to me.

Dec 16
5

I only read two of these, The Only Good Indian which was just great, right up there with Stephen King if you like horror, but with some psychological twists to it (especially the first long section), plus not all the characters are white guys from Maine. I also read A Deadly Education which was pretty fun, kind of Read more

Nov 9
3

It seems to be a William Gibson quote: “The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed.”